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File: 1468382079908.png (834.34 KB, 1200x1080, boys who program.png) [ IQDB | SauceNAO ]

 No.6550[View All]

Does /nen/ know how to program?
231 posts and 55 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.30391

>>30389
We're talking about text editors. Elitism and text editors are inseparable.

 No.30396

I bet nenmin already made the nen theme for their editor of choice so I'll just wait for their post

 No.30399

>>30389
I'm not implying im superior, just that vs is bad.

 No.30400

File: 1553101017592.png (383.83 KB, 1024x768, 1384365381216.png) [ IQDB | SauceNAO ]

What programming language does nen write programs?

 No.30402


 No.30403

>>30400
>>30402
I tend to do more with scripts actually though. I wrote a flashcard program with the same spaced repetition system as anki in rc.

 No.30410

>>30387
I use emacs!

 No.30411

It's not /nen/ theme but emacs has a moe-theme which is very cute: https://github.com/kuanyui/moe-theme.el

 No.30414

>>30410
Emacs is almost more like a lisp-based OS run as an applicaiton than just a text editor.
Some people say its bad because its too big and multifunctional, but it seems like thats missing the point, its not that dedicated emacs fans want a very intricate integrated editor, its that they want a lisp based computing environment.
I don't use it, but I might try it if I ever decide to learn a lisp.

 No.30429

I'd like to use emacs but it looks hard

 No.30438

>>30429
You can do it, I believe in you!!

 No.30452

>>30438
how do I start?

 No.30453

>>30452
Start emacs, press Control+h then press t.

 No.30455

>>30452
ctrl x, ctrl c hehe

 No.30617


 No.31058

File: 1556675428703.jpg (411.65 KB, 1280x720, Aikatsu Friends! - 030 [EA….jpg) [ IQDB | SauceNAO ]

I see a lot of misconceptions in this thread about GNU Emacs so I'd like to make a few corrections!

First is the idea that Emacs is a text editing environment or more specifically a programming environment. It's more like an everything environment. Imagine if your text editor, spreadsheet software, mail reader, file browser and web browser all worked in one place, integrated with each other and all worked consistently in the same way. That is the joy of Emacs.

The other is that Emacs is a thing for lispers. The truth is that you don't have to care about Lisp at all to use Emacs. Of course knowing the fundamentals of lisp will enhance your experience, just like knowing to program will enhance your experience using GNU/Linux. I care to know only the very basic fundamentals of Lisp and get by fine with Emacs.

Finally is the idea that Emacs is hard. Emacs is one of the easiest pieces of text-based software ever written. It is extremely accommodating of new users, with evil-mode for users used to vi-keys to "CUA Mode" for people who have "Notepad Keys" still in their muscle memory (Ctrl+C Ctrl+V Ctrl+A for Copy, Paste and Select All respectively, for example). People complain that Emacs keybindings are difficult and arbitrary but the truth is that most keybindings are extremely stupid and arbitrary no matter what software you use (Ctrl+C to copy, okay, Ctrl+V because it's next to Ctrl+C? Cut is Ctrl+X because ???). Emacs has multiple keybindings for most common tasks though, so just use whatever you prefer. I much rather use arrow keys + Pg Up/Pg Down to navigate than M-v for page down.

For anybody who would like to use Emacs, I recommend not reading the tutorial on the startup page. It's older than the dinosaurs and better made for someone who is entirely new to computers. Read the documentation with `C-h r` (Ctrl+h r) and don't force yourself. Also I recommend adding "alias emacs='emacs -nw'" to your .bashrc to enable easy editing from a terminal.

 No.31075

>>31058
So its an operating system

 No.31169

>>31075
I'm of the opinion that the kernel is the OS so I would say it is not.

 No.31240

>>31169
Thats a silly opinion, the OS is the computing environment. UNIX utilities, shell features, and other userland things are just as important to it as an OS as kernel level things.
In the development of plan9, important functions will switch between the kernel and userspace libraries as the developers see fit, but the OS doesnt gain or lose features in that process. for another 9 example, the first code written that would become plan9 was a C compiler, a userspace program.

 No.31241

>>6887
>>6933
>>6936
>>21591
>>29898
>>29902
>>29903
>>29904
>>29908
>>29954
>>29959
I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you're referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called "Linux", and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project.

There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called "Linux" distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.

 No.31457

File: 1558563184330.jpg (71.57 KB, 960x720, 039ea404ad2c9985203e958cde….jpg) [ IQDB | SauceNAO ]

Post the 'bugs' line of your /proc/cpuinfo file!

>bugs: cpu_meltdown spectre_v1 spectre_v2 spec_store_bypass l1tf mds


Some admins are reporting as much as a 25% hit to performance because of all of the CPU bug mitigations.

https://www.zdnet.com/article/fending-off-zombieload-attacks-will-crush-your-performance/

CPUs were a mistake...

 No.31458

File: 1558567635951.png (35.96 KB, 225x186, computeran.png) [ IQDB | SauceNAO ]

>>31457
Mine is empty. But it's super old and doesn't have hyper threading like that article mentions.

 No.31460

>>31457
>fxsave_leak sysret_ss_attrs null_seg spectre_v1 spectre_v2 spec_store_bypass
Hrrmmnn

 No.31468

>>31457
> cpu_meltdown spectre_v1 spectre_v2 spec_store_bypass l1tf

 No.31469

>>31457
Meltdown was the one with the really big performance hit, right?

 No.31472

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep bugs
bugs:
bugs:
bugs:
bugs:

 No.31473

also i know i can just use grep I just got in the habit of using cat | grep

 No.31474

>>31457
bugs: cpu_meltdown spectre_v1 spectre_v2 spec_store_bypass l1tf mds
My poor T61... at least it has a X9000.

 No.31479

>>31458
Very smart of you anon. I was looking on ebay and found a decades old Acer eee pc, absolutely hideous and probably a battery life of 2-3 minutes but at least I would be truly secure.

 No.31483

I wonder if all these bugs are why my computer feels so slow now. It used to play games just fine a few years ago but even booting up those old games now they seem so choppy and slow

 No.31485

I wonder if all these bugs are why my computer feels so slow now. It used to play games just fine a few years ago but even booting up those old games now they seem so choppy and slow

 No.31488

>>31484
>>31486
Please try speaking in normal human language.

 No.31490

>>31489
children what's that sound

 No.31491

>>31486
yeah my cpu is a wibbly wobbly 10 years old, I probably need to get a newer one but then I'd have to get a new motherboard and ram and thats just a whole lot of money.

 No.31494

>>31488
uwu saikin my pc-chan is osoi to okiteru i wonder if she's getting tsukareterued because of her toshi wwwwwwwwwwww gets muzukashiier to miru my doggo dougas mainichi everyday wwwwwwwwww

 No.31503

>>31500
nenning softly with pcfren

 No.31505

>>31473
Thats absolutely fine, it makes no difference
Dont listen to people who fuss over pedantic things like that.

 No.31522

File: 1558833096430.png (98.71 KB, 600x375, 6428b6750ffdd06f4841671ae6….png) [ IQDB | SauceNAO ]

I want to go to a Linux User Group or an tech-related event of some sort but nobody holds those kinds of things in my kuso ass part of the world incohrent screeching

 No.32597

>>32594
learn C

 No.32598

>>32597
Do you have a good book to recommend for someone with no prior programming knowledge?

 No.32599

>>32594
print(type(variable))

 No.32613

>>32594
That's because Python is a crap language, you're getting tricked into thinking its a good or usable language because it was a fad language 10 years ago like Rust is today and there's a bunch of python code lying around that people have to maintain now. If you really want to learn a new language you should learn C++ or Perl.

 No.32621

File: 1565161660731.png (82.12 KB, 167x173, ooOOOO.PNG) [ IQDB | SauceNAO ]

>>32613
I attempted to get into programming a couple of years ago but I don't think I have the patience for it (and I'm a little lazy).

 No.32624

>>32598
yes in fact
Beej's guide to C programming
First programming book that actually made sense or helped for me
https://beej.us/guide/bgc/

 No.32626

>>32613
Python, C, C++ and Perl are bad languages. Learn F#, Elixir, LISP and the like.

 No.32633

pythons lambda syntax is atrocious and list comprehension is not a fine substitute because its literally unreadable, I want my map and filter to go on separate lines

 No.32635

>>32626
This is a functional programing nerd
Functional programming is cool, but dont embrace everything and anything such people say blindly, they're too invested in one idea.

 No.32636

>>32624
Thank you

 No.32948

So a few nights ago my wireless router's antennas fried and I had to get a new one. It was super old, one of those blue Linksys WRT routers that you could flash all sorts of firmware on. Anyways do your research and read reviews before buying routers, because there's some really crappy and quite frankly scary routers they sell at the stores. One of them was reported to transmit all your traffic to a 3rd party 'for your security' (Cheap ASUS thing). I got a TP-Link router that had some really weird stuff built in including a bittorrent client but thankfully it was extremely simple to flash DD-WRT onto it.

 No.32962

File: 1567364632790.png (194.83 KB, 638x783, 10d384236c7cb321.png) [ IQDB | SauceNAO ]

Today I wrote some emacs commands to make my life easier. It's not much and honestly my elisp is horrible, but it made me feel really powerful!



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